Abstract

THE EFFECTS OF MUSIC AND VIDEO ON PERCEIVED EXERTION AND PERFORMANCE OF A CYCLING TASK AT VIGOROUS INTENSITY

Presenters:
Enoch Chow, New Mind Education, USA

Theme: Exercise and health behaviors

Poster Number: 104

Program ID: POS-2

Presentation: October 4, 2013 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Room: Napoleon

Abstract:

Physical activity can benefit all individuals by increasing their physical, mental, and emotional health. Therefore, the identification of ways to increase participation in physical activity is a popular area of research. Researchers have found that the use of dissociative attentional strategies is associated with increased physical activity. According to research, when administered individually music and video (dissociative strategies) both decrease an individual’s perceived exertion during low to moderate intensity activity. However, at vigorous intensities the results are less consistent. The potential effects of music and video administered simultaneously have not been compared to the effects of either in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in attentional focus and perceived exertion during vigorous intensity exercise as a function of being exposed to music, video, both (music and video), or nothing. All participants were healthy males according to ACSM guidelines. Every participant completed 5 sessions, a VO2 maximal output session to identify ventilatory threshold (VT), followed by four experimental sessions (music, video, both, nothing) completed in a random order. During these sessions, participants cycled at a vigorous intensity (125% VT) for 20 minutes on a recumbent bicycle. All sessions were separated by at least 24 hrs; no participant engaged in more than two sessions per week. Results showed that at vigorous intensity, participants receiving both music and video perceived significantly lower exertion and had a significantly more dissociative focus than did participants in the other three conditions. There was no significant difference amongst the other conditions. It was concluded that even at vigorous intensity exercise, a participant could use music and video to enhance their use of dissociative strategies and to perceive less exertion. The result of perceiving less exertion could lead to increased exercise adherence, which could have important implications for public health.

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