Abstract

Sport type, gender, and experience differences in trait anxiety and trait self-confidence among collegiate athletes

Presenters:
Kevin Crombie, Barry University, USA
Nicholas Zambrotta, Barry University, USA
Gualberto Cremades, Barry University, USA

Theme: Anxiety, stress, and emotions

Poster Number: 82

Program ID: POS-2

Presentation: October 4, 2013 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Room: Napoleon

Abstract:

Past research (Hogg, 1980; Zeng, 2003) has shown equivocal results when investigating differences in self-confidence and anxiety levels in individual sports compared to team sports. In addition, gender and experience have been shown to influence anxiety and self-confidence levels (Modrono & Guillen, 2011). The purpose of this study was to determine gender, sport type (i.e. team vs. individual), and college experience (i.e., lower classmen vs. upperclassman) differences on the intensity and direction of trait anxiety and trait self-confidence among collegiate athletes. Data were collected from a total of 33 intercollegiate NCAA Division II athletes. The Competitive Trait Anxiety Inventory-2D (CTAI-2D; Jones & Swain, 1995) was used to determine the intensity and direction of cognitive and somatic trait anxiety as well as trait self-confidence levels among participants. Two separate 2 x 2 x 2 (gender x sport type x experience) factorial MANOVAs were carried out. A significant main effect was revealed for gender (p < .01) in the intensity scale. Follow-up ANOVAs showed a significant main effect for gender in trait self-confidence intensity (p < .01). Males had greater levels of trait self-confidence intensity than females. Furthermore, a significant interaction effect sport type by experience (p < .05) was revealed in the directional scale. Follow-up ANOVAs showed a significant interaction effect sport type by experience for cognitive trait anxiety (p < .05) and somatic trait anxiety (p < .01) in the directional scale. Upperclassmen had greater levels of cognitive and somatic trait anxiety for the directional scale than underclassmen in individual sports. The results of this study suggest that trait self-confidence intensity levels may differ in terms of gender among collegiate athletes. In addition, cognitive and somatic trait anxiety in the perception of athletes as being facilitative or debilitative toward performance may be influenced by the sport type and experience.

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