Abstract

AN EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COPING STRATEGIES, STRESS, MOOD, AND ADHERENCE THROUGHOUT INJURY REHABILITATION IN AN ACTIVE POPULATION

Presenters:
Elizabeth Kingen, Coram, USA
Jamie Shapiro, University of Denver, USA

Theme: Injury/trauma/rehabilitation

Poster Number: 34

Program ID: POS-1

Presentation: October 3, 2013 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Room: Napoleon

Abstract:

The psychological response to injury is often conceptualized by cognitive appraisal models, which suggest an individual’s perceptions surrounding injury results in varied emotional and behavioral responses (Brewer, 2010; Quinn & Fallon, 1999). Considering the extensive amount of investigation surrounding this model and others (Green & Weinberg, 2007), there has been little research on the correlations between coping strategies and psychological factors throughout injury rehabilitation. Furthermore, how these connections might change at specific time points during a rehabilitation program has also lacked exploration (Brewer, 1994, 2010). Finally, many studies on injury rehabilitation have included college athletes as participants; few studies have examined a general injured population. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coping mechanisms and specific psychological and behavioral (i.e., stress, mood, adherence) factors at four specific time points during a rehabilitation program with an active population. Post-surgical participants (N = 29) concurrently enrolled in a rehabilitation program completed measures of coping skills, stress, mood, and adherence at predetermined time points throughout their injury recovery. The researchers found that problem-focused coping was correlated with the use of adaptive emotion-focused coping throughout all time periods (r = .52 - .83, p < .05). Also, maladaptive emotion-focused coping had an undesirable impact on negative mood and stress at several time periods, with the strongest relationship at time 2 (one-third through recovery; r = .79 - .81, p < .01). Finally, the current study illuminated a significant inverse relationship between adherence and negative mood at time 2 (r = -.48, p < .05), suggesting that when negative mood increases, adherence suffers. These findings provide insight into how practitioners can create an individualized rehabilitation program, which incorporates coping skills that can help decrease negative mood and stress, increase adherence, and further promote recovery.

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